What is VFR?

VFR stands for variable frame rate. This is footage taken from a screen or camera that is not recording in a static frame rate such as 24, 30, or 60 frames per second. A good example of this is a screen recording or a video chat recording, from tools like Zoom or Google Meet.

When bringing this footage into Premiere Pro without transcoding it into a static frame rate, your footage will likely have visible damage.

Example:

VFR

https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/secure.notion-static.com/9c6e89e8-f9df-478c-b195-d7bfb813375f/Untitled.png

Static 30fps

https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/secure.notion-static.com/76331b96-7b28-491e-9b6c-5bf7ec523ace/Untitled.png

This issue can be solved but does take an extra few steps in the editing process.

Solution

  1. Import your footage into Premiere Pro

  2. Find VFR footage

  3. Select clip with the potential issue

  4. Right-click

  5. Select Properties from the menu

  6. See the last line in the properties inspector

    https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/secure.notion-static.com/d1d8ae41-beb5-4f8a-8b06-71f0386c1683/Group_1.png

  7. If footage states Variable Frame Rate Detected then this footage will likely be damaged at multiple parts in the clip

  8. To correct this we need to transcode the footage

  9. Right-click and click Open in Finder

  10. Once the clip is found – launch Adobe Media Encoder

  11. Drag clip into Media Encoder

  12. Select Format

  13. Select any format you'd like, for my example, we will be using h.264

    https://youtu.be/xJFI5VHRi04